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10 Famous Coca-Cola Myths

10 Famous Coca-Cola Myths


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Fact or fiction? These Coke rumors may be famous, but they're not necessarily true

Coke has generated some strange rumors over the years.

With a company as large and well-known as Coca-Cola, a few baseless rumors are bound to spring up, but Coke seems to have collected an especially vast amount of strange gossip even for an organization of its renown and size.

Have you heard that Coca-Cola spelled backwards is actually a secret anti-Muslim message written in Arabic? Or that a can of Coke will dissolve a steak in 48 hours?

10 Famous Coca-Cola Myths (Slideshow)

Maybe you’ve gotten a little case of the chills after hearing that some mysteriously kind terrorists are running around warning waiters to avoid drinking Coke after a certain date?

None of these rumors are true, but they and plenty of equally-strange stories have been widely spread. While some of them have a grain of truth, others are entirely fabricated. We’re not really sure why anyone would go around making up stories about Coke when there are enough strange-but-true facts to more than make up for these stories proving to be false. For instance, Coke really did used to contain cocaine, it was marketed many years ago as a “nerve tonic,” and was believed, once upon a time, to cure morphine addiction. It can also actually be used as a not-too-shabby ingredient in a glaze for ham.

One absolutely factual rumor? If you and a friend say the same thing at the exact same time and your friend tells you, “Jinx! You owe me a Coke,” you really do have to buy them a Coke as soon as you can or the jinx won’t be lifted. That one’s real.

Curious if Coke is really vegetarian? Want to know if you should be using it to strip motor oil and clean your car’s engine?

Take a look at our 10 Famous Coca-Cola Myths Slideshow to find out which of the rumors you may have heard have a basis in truth, and which are completely false.

This article was originally published on March 17, 2013.


Coca-Cola secret recipe revealed? It's the real thing, says radio host

F or almost 125 years, the secrecy surrounding the recipe for Coca-Cola has been one of the world's great marketing ploys. As the story goes, the fizzy drink's famous "Merchandise 7X" flavourings have remained unchanged since they were concocted in 1886 and the recipe is today entrusted only to two Coke executives, neither of whom can travel on the same plane for fear the secret goes down with them.

Now one of America's most celebrated radio broadcasters claims to have discovered the Coke secret. Ira Glass, presenter of the public radio institution This American Life, says he has tracked down a copy of the recipe, the original of which is still supposedly held in a burglar-proof vault at the Sun Trust bank in Atlanta, Georgia.

The seven-ingredient formula was created by John Pemberton, an Atlanta chemist and former Confederate army officer who crafted cough medicines and other concoctions in his spare time. In 1887, he sold the recipe to a businessman, Asa Griggs, who immediately placed it for safekeeping in the then Georgia Trust bank.

Glass came across a recipe that he believes is the secret formula in a back issue of Pemberton's local paper, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, while he was researching an entirely different story. Tucked away on an inside page of the 8 February 1979 edition, he stumbled on an article that claimed to have uncovered the closely guarded 7x formula.

The column was based on an old leather-bound notebook that belonged to Pemberton's best friend and fellow Atlanta chemist, RR Evans. Glass was intrigued and, after some digging, found the notebook had been handed down the generations until it reached a chemist in Georgia called Everett Beal, whose widow still possesses it.

The rediscovered recipe includes extract of coca leaves, caffeine, plenty of sugar (it specifies 30 unidentified units thought to be pounds), lime juice, vanilla and caramel. Into that syrup, the all-important 7x flavourings are added: alcohol and six oils – orange, lemon, nutmeg, coriander, neroli and cinnamon.

The formula is strikingly similar to the recipe deduced by Mark Pendergrast who wrote a history of the drink in 1993 called For God, Country & Coca-Cola.

Coke's secret recipe is, in fact, part mythology. Contrary to the mystique surrounding it, the soda has in fact changed substantially over time.

Cocaine, a legal stimulant in Pemberton's day, was removed from the drink in 1904 after mounting public unease about the drug. Extract of coca leaves have still been used but only after the cocaine has been removed.

In 1980, the company largely replaced sugar, squeezed from beet and cane, with the cheaper high-fructose corn sweetener that has become ubiquitous in American food and drink. Coke purists were not impressed.

Despite such occasional controversies, one element has remained constant: Coke's commitment to keeping its own secret. Speculation about the recipe has been a popular talking point for more than a century, proving good for business.

True to form, the company has treated the This American Life story with the disdain that has marked its commercial strategy since the 19th century.

"Many third parties have tried to crack our secret formula. Try as they might, they've been unsuccessful," Coca-Cola's Kerry Tressler said.


Famous Coca-Cola myths

With a company as large and well-known as Coca-Cola, a few baseless rumors are bound to spring up, but Coke seems to have collected an especially vast amount of strange gossip even for an organization of its renown and size.

Have you heard that Coca-Cola spelled backwards is actually a secret anti-Muslim message written in Arabic? Or that a can of Coke will dissolve a steak in 48 hours?

Maybe you’ve gotten a little case of the chills after hearing that some mysteriously kind terrorists are running around warning waiters to avoid drinking Coke after a certain date?

None of these rumors are true, but they and plenty of equally-strange stories have been widely spread. While some of them have a grain of truth, others are entirely fabricated.

We’re not really sure why anyone would go around making up stories about Coke when there are enough strange-but-true facts to more than make up for these stories proving to be false.

For instance, Coke really did used to contain cocaine, it was marketed many years ago as a “nerve tonic,” and was believed, once upon a time, to cure morphine addiction.

It can also actually be used as a not-too-shabby ingredient in a glaze for ham.

One absolutely factual rumor? If you and a friend say the same thing at the exact same time and your friend tells you, “Jinx! You owe me a Coke,” you really do have to buy them a Coke as soon as you can or the jinx won’t be lifted. That one’s real.

Curious if Coke is really vegetarian? Want to know if you should be using it to strip motor oil and clean your car’s engine?

Take a look at these famous Coca-Cola myths to find out which of the rumors you may have heard have a basis in truth, and which are completely false.


Closeup of beautiful woman biting an ice cube on white (iStock)

While leaving a tooth soaking in any form of acid, no matter how mild, can’t be great for enamel, the acids present in Coke are actually relatively mild compared to other common foods, including orange juice and regular vinegar used in salad.


"Coke contains pork."

Several years ago, an internet rumor popped up outraging Coke fans—the drink allegedly contained pork! Despite this myth gaining traction every few years, Coca-Cola representatives have released multiple statements denying this rumor and blatantly stating that no meat products make their way into the beverage. Who knows how or why this rumor grew so rapidly, but we can rest easy knowing this soda still remains 100% vegan.

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A Commercial Success

The television ad "I'd Like to Buy the World a Coke" was released in the United States in July 1971 and the response was immediate and dramatic. By November of that year, Coca-Cola and its bottlers had received more than 100,000 letters about the ad. Demand for the song was so great, many people called radio stations and asked deejays to play the commercial.

"I'd Like to Buy the World a Coke" made a lasting connection with the viewing public. Advertising surveys consistently identify it as one of the best commercials of all time, and the sheet music continues to sell more than 30 years after the song was written. A tribute to the success of the campaign, the commercial resurfaced over 40 years after it first launched, making an appearance in the finale of the hit TV show "Mad Men" in 2015.


Vault of the Secret Formula

V isit the vault where the legendary secret formula for Coca‑Cola is secured. Regarded as the most closely guarded and best-kept secret, the secret formula for Coca‑Cola represents over 125 years of history, special moments, memories and the timeless appeal associated with Coca‑Cola. Now our guests can get closer to the famous secret formula than ever before!

Travel through the exhibit on an immersive multimedia journey toward the Chamber of the Secret Formula. Along the way, learn about the origins of the secret formula, how competitors tried to copy the success of Coca‑Cola, how the owners of Coca‑Cola kept the formula secret throughout the years and how the secrecy spawned a trove of myths and legends.

Have fun with the various interactive experiences throughout the exhibit like the Virtual Taste Maker, which invites you to create taste and flavor combinations the same way early pharmacists and inventors did. As you turn the five physical dials, you add flavor qualities to your “mix,” and dramatically affect the visuals and sound effects. Test your mix to see how your flavors compare with the perfect flavor combination of Coca‑Cola.

The Bubble-izer is another interactive experience which gives you a chance to become part of the secret. As you approach this interactive, you will be transformed into an effervescent bubbling form and immersed into the bubble and fizz of Coca‑Cola. You can capture a photo of your bubbly visualization making a funny face or dancing to share with your friends.

Then you can test how well you protect the secret through an immersive full body interactive experience that leads you through three virtual environments—the Triangle Room, Secure Train Car and Bank Vault—all locations where the secret formula has been kept. You can also participate in group game play as you trigger animations and watch these environments magically change and come to life. Challenge your friends and family to see how well you protect the secret.


Gatorade is the leader of the sports drink game, so it's no surprise it's one of the country's most famous beverages. With its ability to turn your tongue blue and its decidedly nondescript flavors (Glacier Freeze, anyone?), Gatorade has made a name for itself in the bottled drink market. If you really want to quench your thirst, though, check out these healthy foods that are better for hydration than Gatorade.


15 Facts About Coca-Cola That Will Blow Your Mind

The iconic American brand is recognized instantly around the globe and sold in more than 200 countries. Additionally there are thousands of subsidiary beverages that you might have no idea are owned by Coke.

Despite three CEO changes since 2000, Coke has kept a firm lead in the U.S. carbonated drinks market, with 42.8% market share to Pepsi's 31.1%.

Altogether 1.7 billion servings of Coke products are consumed every day.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 ½ cups miniature marshmallows
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 cup cola-flavored carbonated beverage
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • ½ cup butter
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 6 tablespoons cola-flavored carbonated beverage
  • 4 cups confectioners' sugar
  • 1 cup chopped pecans

Combine flour and white sugar in mixing bowl. Heat 1 cup butter, 3 tablespoons cocoa, and 1 cup cola soft drink to boiling and pour over the flour and sugar. Mix thoroughly.

Add buttermilk, eggs, baking soda, vanilla, and marshmallows and mix well.

Bake in a prepared 9 by 13 inch pan for 40 minutes at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

While still hot, frost with Coco Cola Frosting: Combine 1/2 cup butter or margarine, 2 tablespoons cocoa and 6 tablespoons cola soft drink and heat to boiling. Pour over 4 cups confectioners' sugar and mix well. Mix in chopped nuts and spread over hot cake.


Coca Cola Secrets: 7 Things You Never Knew About Coke's Recipe

No matter who you are, you probably remember begging your parents for a glass of Coca-Cola as a child and still crave the fizzy sweetness of it as an adult.

Coca-Cola, one of the world’s most famous drinks, is turning 128 on March 29. The drink was originally created in Atlanta, Georgia by a pharmacist named John Pemberton in 1886 on approximately this date (though its birthday is celebrated on May 8, the date it was first served in a restaurant). In an effort to gain success, Pemberton created several concoctions before coming up with Coca-Cola’s legendary recipe.

Since then, the drink has grown in popularity and is now sold in more than 200 countries. What started as an experiment is now one of the largest corporations in the world, worth an estimated $173 billion, according to Forbes.

The company’s success, however, hasn’t come without controversy, largely surrounding their top secret recipe. While we all know it’s not the healthiest drink in the world, rumours allege that the recipe itself contains harmful acids and extracts from meats.

Here is the truth about some of the craziest rumours surrounding the soft drink’s recipe.


Watch the video: 5 ΣΚΟΤΕΙΝΑ μυστικά της Coca-Cola.


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